Arunachal Pradesh Current Affairs

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Expert Committee Constituted to examine Rules on Movement of People Near Indo-Myanmar Border

Ministry of Home Affairs has constituted an expert committee to examine the rules which allow free movement of people near Indo-Myanmar border. Indian and Myanmarese citizens are permitted free movement within 16 km of the international border, but these rules are widely exploited by militants for smuggling arms, drugs, and fake Indian currency.

The decision to constitute an MHA panel was taken at a meeting of chief ministers of the northeastern states which share a border with Myanmar. This is for the first time that meeting with the state governments has been called to discuss the issues concerning the Myanmar border. The meeting was attended by Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju and chief ministers of Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur and Mizoram, and the Home Minister of Nagaland.

Salient Highlights

The expert committee would be headed by the special secretary (Internal Security) in the Ministry of Home Affairs.

The panel will examine the rules and regulations adopted by the border states for free movement of the people. It has to suggest for uniform and effective implementation of free movement regime in the states which share a porous border with Myanmar

The committee has to come up with standard operating procedures common to all the four states that will provide effective measures to filter out militants, criminals and contraband at the border without causing inconvenience to genuine people.

The panel has to submit its report within three months. 

Background

India shares 1,643-km long border with Myanmar that passes through four states of Arunachal Pradesh, Nagaland, Manipur and Mizoram. At present, both Indian and Myanmarese citizens are permitted a visa-free movement regime within 16 km on either side of the border. They are permitted to stay up to 72 hours with valid permits. These rules were kept in place in view of the traditional and social ties among the border people. There are over 240 villages with an estimated population of 2.5 lakh people living within 10 km of the border. However, India’s international border with Myanmar is very porous with cross-border movement of insurgents and smuggling of arms and ammunition being very common.

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Arunachal Pradesh Demands Separate Time Zone to increase Efficiency

Arunachal Pradesh chief minister Pema Khandu has demand for a separate time zone for the northeastern states to improve work efficiency and save electricity in the region. According to him, several daylight hours are getting wasted as government offices opens only at 10am and closes as early as 4pm.

Background

Recently, the Gauhati High Court dismissed a public interest litigation (PIL) seeking a separate time zone for the northeast region.

A study carried out by Bengaluru-based National Institute of Advanced Studies had concluded that separate time zone for the northeastern region could help in saving 2.7 billion units of electricity every year.

A Planning Commission report which was published in 2006 also called for different time zones in India to improve efficiency.

A similar plea was put forward by Assam chief minister Tarun Gogoi in 2014. He suggested that northeastern region should follow chai bagan (tea garden) time. Chai bagan time is practiced in tea gardens and is one hour ahead of the Indian Standard Time (IST).

Problems with IST for North East

There are periodical demands from people of North East region to have a separate time zone. IST was fixed in 1906 at 82.5°, or 5.30 hours ahead of Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). Although it is not felt by most Indians, it really creates troubles for the people who live in North East. In North East, the day starts getting brighter by 4 AM and darker by 5 PM. The adoption of separate time zone would allow people of North East to begin early and use the time which is currently wasted.
The chaibagan time was introduced by the British over 150 years ago. It was set one hour ahead of the Indian Standard Time (IST) for tea estates, collieries and oil industry of Assam.

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China announces names for six places in Arunachal Pradesh

China has unilaterally announced ‘standardised’ names for six places in Arunachal Pradesh. It is felt that Chinese move comes as a retaliation against Dalai Lama’s visit to Arunachal Pradesh. Experts feel that China’s announcement is aimed at reaffirming its territorial sovereignty over the region.

According to the Chinese foreign ministry, change of names was a legitimate action carried out in line with Chinese law.

China has named the six places in Arunachal Pradesh with Roman alphabet as Wo’gyainling, Mila Ri, Qoidêngarbo Ri, Mainquka, Bümo La and Namkapub Ri. The name Wo’gyainling is likely to be given to the Ugyen Ling monastery (birthplace of the sixth Dalai Lama), Qoidêngarbo Ri is likely to be the name given to Choten Karpo Ri, Mainquka is likely to be Mechuka in West Siang district and Bümo La is likely to be Bumla.

During the visit of Dalai Lama, Union minister of state for home Affairs Kiren Rijiju, had categorically asserted that Arunachal Pradesh is an inseparable and integral part of India.

Background

During the recent visit of Dalai Lama China issued warnings and repeated calls to cancel his visit. But India turned down his request saying that Dalai Lama is free to travel across the country.

According to China, Arunachal Pradesh is part of South Tibet and has close Buddhist links to the Tibet Autonomous Region. Official Chinese maps show Arunachal Pradesh as part of South Tibet. The Indo-China border dispute ensues the 3,488 km-long Line of Actual Control (LAC). So far both the have held 19 rounds of talks to resolve the boundary dispute.

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