Ballistic missiles Current Affairs

India successfully test-fires nuclear capable ballistic missile Agni-5

India successfully test-fired its home-grown long range intercontinental surface-to-surface nuclear capable ballistic missile Agni-5.

The state-of-the-art surface-to-surface missile was test fired successfully from the launch complex 4 of the Integrated Test Range from the Abdul Kalam Wheeler Island off Odisha coast. It was the fourth developmental and second canisterised trial of the missile.

About Agni-5 missile

  • Agni 5 is three-stage solid propellant ICBM indigenously developed by the Defence Research and angni-5-newDevelopment Organisation (DRDO).
  • Unlike other missiles of Agni series, Agni-5 is the most advanced having new technologies incorporated with it in terms of navigation and guidance, warhead and engine.
  • It is about 17 metre long, 2 metre wide and has launch weight of around 50 tonnes. It is capable of striking a target more than 5,000 kilometres with nuclear warhead carrying capacity of more than 1 tonne.
  • Thus, it can hit most northern parts of China and other parts of Asia, Europe and Africa. It has not yet inducted into the Services.
  • It carries Multiple Independently Targetable Re-entry Vehicles (MIRV) payloads. A single MIRV equipped missile that can deliver multiple warheads at different targets.
  • It is also incorporates advanced technologies involving ring laser gyroscope and accelerometer for navigation and guidance.
Comment

Once this missile is inducted in Services, India will join the super exclusive club of countries having ICBMs (missiles with a range of over 5,000-5,500km) alongside the US, Russia, China, France and the United Kingdom. The missile will enhance India’s strategic and deterrence capabilities. At present India in its armoury of Agni missile series, possesses Agni-I (700 km range), Agni-II (2000 km range), Agni-3 (2,500 km range) and Agni-4 ( more than 3,500 range).

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India joins the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation

India has joined the Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCoC), a global ballistic missile proliferation regime.

India has joined the Code highlighting its readiness to further strengthen global non-proliferation objectives.

However, India has made it clear that it will not have any impact on the national security as well as country’s missile programmes.

What is Hague Code of Conduct against Ballistic Missile Proliferation (HCoC)?

  • The HCoC is a voluntary, legally non-binding international confidence building and transparency measure that seeks to prevent the proliferation of ballistic missiles that are capable of delivering weapons of mass destruction (WMD).
  • It was established on 25 November 2002 as a result of international efforts to regulate access to ballistic missiles which can potentially deliver WMDs
  • The HCOC does not ban ballistic missiles, but it calls for restraining their production, testing, and export. It is the only normative instrument to verify the spread of ballistic missiles.

Ballistic Missile: It is a missile with a high, arching trajectory which is initially powered and guided, but falls under gravity on to its target. Most of its trajectory is unpowered and governed by gravity and air resistance if it is in the atmosphere. In contrasts, cruise missiles are aerodynamically guided in powered flight.

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