Bay of Bengal Current Affairs

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Huge dead zone discovered in Bay of Bengal  

Scientists including those from India have found a huge ‘dead zone’ of an estimated 60,000 square kilometres in Bay of Bengal.

This area is said to support microbial processes that remove vast amount of nitrogen from the ocean. The study published in Nature Geosciences.

What is Dead zone?

Dead Zone is an area in water body that contains little or no oxygen (or they are hypoxic) in bottom and near-bottom water. Mostly they occur naturally but it can be caused by excessive nutrient pollution from human activities coupled with other factors. They are well-known off western coasts of North and South America, off coast of Namibia and off west coast of India in Arabian Sea. In recent times, warming of the atmosphere through climate change is predicted to lead expansion of ‘dead zones’ in the ocean.

Key Findings
  • Researchers, including those from CSIR’s National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) in Goa, demonstrated that some oxygen does exists in the Bay of Bengal waters.
  • But the concentration of oxygen is much less than standard techniques could detect and some 10,000 times less than that found in the air-saturated surface waters.
  • The researchers also discovered that the Bay of Bengal hosts microbial communities that can remove nitrogen but at really slow rates.
  • Removing more nitrogen from the oceans could affect the marine nitrogen balance and rates of marine productivity.

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India, Russia bilateral naval exercise Indra Navy 2016 begins 

The ninth edition of exercise INDRA NAVY, an annual bilateral maritime exercise between Indian Navy and Russian Navy began in the Bay of Bengal.

The primary aim of exercise INDRA NAVY-16 is to increase inter-operability amongst the two navies and develop common understanding and procedures for maritime security operations.

Key Facts
  • The scope of the exercise includes wide-ranging professional interactions in harbor phase and a diverse canvas of operational activities across a spectrum of maritime operations at sea.
  • The exercise will be held in two phases viz. Harbour Phase (14 to 18 December 2016) at Visakhapatnam and tSea Phase (19 to 21 December 2016) off Visakhapatnam.
  • The Harbour Phase will encompass table-top exercises, planning conferences, and professional interactions prior progressing to sea.
  • The thrust of exercises at sea will be on Air Defence Drills, ASW, Surface Firings, visit Board Search and Seizure (VBSS) and Tactical procedures.
  • Indian Navy will be represented by INS Ranvir a guided missile destroyer, INS Satpura an indigenous frigate and INS Kamorta an indigenous Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) corvette.
  • In addition, an INS submarine, Dornier Short Range Maritime Patrol Aircraft, P8I Long Range Maritime Patrol Aircraft and other integral rotary wing helicopters will also participate.
  • Russian Navy (RuFN) will be represented by Rear Admiral Eduard Mikhalov, Deputi Chief of Flotilla, Pacific Fleet and ships from the Pacific Fleet, based at Vladivostok. RuFN ships Admiral Tributus (cruiser) and Boris Butoma (fleet tanker) are part of the fleet.
Background

INDRA NAVY is a bilateral maritime exercise between the Indian and Russian navies was initiated in 2003. It epitomizes the strategic relationship between the two countries. Over the years, the exercise has matured with increase in scope, complexity of operations and level of participation.

Comment

Exercise INDRA NAVY 16 will help to further strengthen mutual confidence and inter-operability, and also enable sharing of best practices between both navies. It will be another milestone in strengthening maritime security cooperation between Indian and Russia. It will also serve to reinforce the long standing bond of friendship between the two countries.

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Tropical Cyclonic Storm Vardah to hit Andhra Pradesh

The tropical cyclonic storm Vardah over southeast Bay of Bengal is expected to hit Andhra Pradesh coast between Nellore and Kakinada. It is the third cyclonic storm of the season after Cyclone Kyant and Nada, that were formed during the Northeast Monsoon season.

Formation

It was created as depression (low pressure) over Andaman Sea and later slightly intensified further as cyclonic storm. The reason for the intensification can be attributed to warm sea surface temperatures of Bay of Bengal and longer sea travel. Since then, the tropical cyclonic storm Vardah has moved north-northwestwards with a speed of 10 kmph about 990 km southeast of Visakhapatnam and 250 km west-northwest of Port Blair.

Intensification

The system is very likely to intensify further into a severe cyclonic storm. However, there is possibility of slight weakening of the system before landfall. It may result into moderate rainfall at many places with isolated heavy falls over coastal Andhra Pradesh. Squally winds speed reaching 35-45 kmph gusting to 55 kmph would prevail over Andaman and Nicobar Islands & adjoining sea areas for some time. Fishermen have been advised not to venture into sea along and off Andaman Islands and off Andhra Pradesh coast and adjoining sea areas.

vardah

 

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