China Current Affairs

Enter Your Email Address To Subscribe Daily Digest of Current Affairs:

China launches first commercial space mission with new Kuaizhou-1A rocket  

China successfully launched first commercial mission using an updated version of the low-cost Kuaizhou-1A rocket. As part of the mission three satellites JL-1, CubeSats XY-S1 and Caton-1 were launched into space.

 The rocket was launched form northwestern China’s Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in Gansu province. Rocket technology company under the state owned China Aerospace Science and Industry Corporation (ACSIC) was responsible for the successful launch mission. 

Key Facts
  • The success of the mission marks the Chinese company’s capability of providing flexible, convenient, quick and economical launch services for domestic and overseas clients.
  • KZ-1A rocket: It is improvised and advance version of erstwhile Kuaizhou-1 rocket. It is a low-cost solid- fuelled carrier rocket with high reliability and short preparation period. It has been designed to launch low-orbit satellites weighing less than 300 kg.
  • JL-1 Satellite: It is a multifunctional remote-sensing satellite providing high-definition video images. It is expected to be used for environmental protection, land resource and forestry surveying, transport and disaster prevention and relief purposes.
  • XY-S1 and Caton-1 Satellites: They are experimental satellites to test technologies of low-orbit narrow-band communication and VHF Data Exchange System (VDES) respectively.

Tags:

China passes law to levy environment tax to fight pollution

China’s top legislature has passed Environment Tax to levy environment tax on polluters, especially on heavy industries. It will enter into force on January 1, 2018.

The law aims to improve taxpayers’ environmental awareness, force companies to upgrade technology and shift to cleaner production.

Key Facts
  • Under the new law, companies will pay environment taxes ranging from 350 yuan ($60) to 11,200 yuan ($1870) per month for noise.
  • It set rates of 1.4 yuan on water pollutants, 1.2 yuan on stipulated quantities of air pollutants and a range of 5 to 1,000 yuan for each ton of solid waste.
  • It allows provincial-level governments to raise rates for air and water pollution by up to 10 times after approval by local legislatures.
  • Under it, lower rates can also be applicable if emissions are less than national standards. It only targets enterprises and public institutions that discharge listed pollutants directly into environment.
  • Punishments for evasion or fraud have not been specified, but it says that offenders will be held liable in line with the law on administration of taxation and the environmental law.
  • Greenhouse gas Carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the major contributors to global warming, is not included in the levying list. 
Background

China is the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases (GHGs), due to its heavy reliance on coal to provide electricity to its population of 1.37 billion (world’s largest). Since 1979, China has collected a “pollutant discharge fee” which not enforced by any law. In 2015, it collected 17.3 billion yuan (about 2.5 billion dollars) from some 280,000 businesses. However, it was found that some local governments were exploiting loopholes and exempting pollution enterprises.

Tags:

China launches TanSat satellite to monitor global carbon emissions

China successfully launched TanSat, a global carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring satellite to understand the effects of climate change.

It was launched on board of Long March-2D rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in northwest China’s Gobi Desert.  It was the 243rd mission of the Long March series rockets.

With this, China became third country after Japan and United States to have its own satellite to monitor greenhouse gases (GHGs).

About TanSat satellite

  • TanSat will thoroughly examine global CO2 levels every 16 days, accurate to at least 4 ppm (parts per million).
  • It weighs 620-kg and will be located in sun synchronous orbit about 700 kms above the earth. It has three-year mission life.
  • It will thoroughly monitor the concentration, distribution and flow of CO2 levels every 16 days, accurate to at least 4 ppm (parts per million) in the atmosphere.
  • The satellite will help understanding of climate change and provide China’s policy makers with independent emissions data in first-hand and share it with researchers worldwide.
  • It will give China a louder voice on climate change, carbon reduction negotiation and bigger say on carbon trading.

Tags:

Advertisement

12345...102030...123