Project 15A Current Affairs

INS Chennai dedicated to Chennai

Naval Ship ‘INS Chennai’, a ‘P15A Guided Missile Destroyer’, was dedicated to Chennai in the presence of the chief minister of Tamil Nadu and the Flag Officer Commanding-in-Chief, Eastern Naval Command.

INS Chennai

INS Chennai, a Kolkata-class stealth Guided missile destroyer ship was commissioned into Indian Navy’s combat fleet by Defence minister Manohar Parrikar on 21 November 2016 in Mumbai. It is the largest-ever destroyer to be built in India. It is third and last Kolkata-class guided missile destroyers built under Project 15A. 

The indigenously designed ship has state of the art weapons and sensors, stealth features, an advanced action information system, a comprehensive auxiliary control system, world class modular living spaces, sophisticated power distribution system and a host of other advanced features. The ship is capable of undertaking a full spectrum of maritime warfare. The ship has the formidable prowess of missile technology and has been armed with supersonic surface to surface ‘BrahMos’ missiles and ‘Barak-8’ long-range surface to air missiles.

The Project 15A Kolkata class are a class of stealth guided missile destroyers built for Indian Navy. These destroyers are follow-on of the legendary Project 15 ‘Delhi’ class destroyers which entered service in the late 1990s. The class comprises of three ships. INS Kolkata, the first ship of the class got commissioned on August, 2014. The second ship, INS Kochi, got commissioned on September, 2015. The third ship, INS Chennai, got commissioned on November, 2016

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Stealth Guided missile destroyer INS Chennai commissioned into Indian Navy

INS Chennai, a Kolkata-class stealth Guided missile destroyer ship was commissioned into Indian Navy’s combat fleet by Defence minister Manohar Parrikar in Mumbai, Maharashtra.

It is the largest-ever destroyer to be built in India. It is third and last Kolkata-class guided missile destroyers built under Project 15A. Thus, its induction also marks the end of the Project 15A.

Key features

  • INS Chennai has been named after the iconic port city of Chennai. It is 164 metres long with a displacement of over 7,500 tonnes.
  • It has been built at the Mazagon Dock Shipbuilders Ltd in Mumbai under the strategic Project 15A.
  • It can sail at a top speed of over 30 knots (around 55 kms) per hour and is propelled by four powerful Gas Turbines, in a Combined Gas and Gas (COGAG) configuration.
  • The ship has enhanced stealth features resulting in a reduced Radar Cross Section (RCS) and uses radar transparent materials on exposed decks.
  • It is armed with Barak-8 Long Rang Surface-to-Air missiles and supersonic surface-to-surface BrahMos missiles.
  • INS Chennai is fitted with ‘Kavach’ chaff decoy system for defence against enemy missiles and ‘Mareech’ torpedo decoy system for protection from enemy torpedoes.
  • Its undersea warfare capability includes indigenously developed anti-submarine weapons and sensors, hull-mounted sonar HUMSA-NG, towed array sonar capability, heavyweight torpedo tube launchers and rocket launchers.
  • The ship is truly classified as a ‘Network of Networks’ as it is equipped with sophisticated digital networks, such as ATM based Integrated Ship Data Network (AISDN), Automatic Power Management System (APMS), Auxiliary Control System (ACS) and Combat Management System (CMS).
  • It will be placed under the operational and administrative control of the Western Naval Command based in Mumbai. It has a complement of about 45 officers and 395 personnel.

About Project 15A

  • Under this project Kolkata class of stealth guided missile destroyers have been built for Indian Navy.
  • The class comprises of three ships and are the largest destroyers to be operated by the Indian Navy.
  • The first ship of this class named INS Kolkata was commissioned in August 2014 followed by INS Kochi commissioned in September 2015.
  • These destroyers are follow-on of the legendary Project 15 ‘Delhi’ class destroyers which had entered service in the late 1990s.

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