Current Affairs Today - Current Affairs 2017

हिंदी करंट अफेयर्स प्रश्नोत्तरी 2017 के लिए यहाँ क्लिक करें.

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RBI penalizes 22 banks for violating KYC norms

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) has fined 22 banks by imposing penalty for violating Know-Your-Customer (KYC) norms and anti-money laundering guidelines. The banks who have been fined include SBI, Bank of Baroda, Canara Bank and some other banks all of whom have been fined Rs.3 crore each. The central bank also issued “cautionary letters” to seven other banks including Citibank, Standard Chartered and Barclays as no violation of serious nature by them was established.

The violations by the public sector banks were revealed in a sting operation by online portal, Cobrapost.

As per the RBI, the investigation against the fined banks did not reveal any prima facie evidence of money laundering.

The banks who have been penalized for violating Know Your Customer (KYC)/Anti-Money Laundering norms includes the country’s largest bank, State Bank of India, and other public sector banks such as Punjab National Bank, Bank of India and Canara Bank. Earlier, three ‘new generation’ private banks were slapped with stiff fines by the central bank whose investigations followed an expose by online portal Cobrapost. The latest list includes the relatively new Yes Bank as well as some old private banks such as Lakshmi Vilas Bank.

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Scientist engineer “Functional” blood vessels in mice made from stem cells

Scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, and Harvard Stem Institute, Harvard University have been able to engineer “stable and functional” blood vessels in mice using induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells taken from skin of healthy people and those with Type I diabetes. The blood vessels lasted for 280 days in the brain of the mice.

How was the functional blood vessel created?

Scientist used induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cells taken from skin of healthy people and those with Type I diabetes. These cells produced vascular precursor cells — endothelial precursor cells and mesenchymal precursor cells from iPS cells. While endothelial cells form the inner lining of blood vessels, mesenchymal cells provide structural stability. Then they were grown in a dish in a medium which provided the nutriments and suitable environment. After the cells attained a certain optimum growth stage forming an “engineered construct”, it was then transferred onto the brain and dorsal skin of the mice and visualized with a microscope. It was also subcutaneously injected into the backs of the animals. The mice with subcutaneously injected construct were sacrificed (killed) after two weeks. Even within this short period, it had formed blood vessels and connected with the animals’ vessels. The presence of mouse RBCs in the engineered vessels is proof that blood had flowed through them.

How would it help in future?

This work is proof of concept demonstration that vascular precursor cells — endothelial precursor cells and mesenchymal precursor cells from iPS cells — can be used to engineer blood vessel. This study holds great promise to restore blood flow, especially in the case of Type II diabetic patients with ischemia in the foot.

British Government decorates Krishna Menon’s London home with blue plaque

MenonIn commemoration to V.K. Krishna Menon’s long and eventful association with London, the British government has decided to put up an English Heritage blue plaque at the house where he lived when he first moved to the city. Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru and Sardar Patel are among the other Indian leaders previously honoured by English Heritage.

Who was V.K. Krishna Menon?

(Born: May 3, 1896, died October 6, 1974)

Vengalil Krishnan Krishna Menon was an Indian nationalist, diplomat and statesman. He was India’s first High Commissioner to the UK and later became Defence Minister of India from 1957 to 1962.

Menon in the UK

While his stay in the UK, he served as a Labour councillor for the Borough of St. Pancras in 1930s, and is still remembered for introducing travelling libraries and children’s corners. During the Second World War, he served as an air warden around Camden Square, where he lived at the time, and in 1955 St. Pancras conferred on him the Freedom of the Borough, the only other person so honoured being George Bernard Shaw. He was described by the former Labour Prime Minister, James Callaghan as “the embodiment of the movement within Britain for India’s freedom.”

Menon in India:

Menon was noted for his eloquence, brilliance, and forceful, highly abrasive persona. He inspired widespread adulation and fervent detraction in both India and the West; to his supporters, he was an unapologetic champion of India in the face of Western imperialism. Returning to India, he was repeatedly elected to both houses of the Indian parliament from constituencies as varied as Bombay, Bengal, and his native Kerala, and served as Minister of Defense, overseeing the modernization of the Indian military and development of the Indian military-industrial complex, and spearheading the Indian annexation of Goa. He resigned in the wake of the Sino-Indian war, following allegations of India’s military unpreparedness, but remained counselor to Nehru, Member of Parliament and elder statesman until his death.

As as Minister of Defense, overseeing the modernisation of the Indian military and development of the Indian military-industrial complex, and spearheading the Indian annexation of Goa. He resigned in the wake of the Sino-Indian war, following allegations of India’s military unpreparedness, but remained counselor to Nehru, member of parliament and elder statesman until his death.

Who are the other Indian leaders honored with Blue Plaque previously?

Other Indian leaders namely Mahatma Gandhi, Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Jawaharlal Nehru and Sardar Patel have been honoured by this English Heritage, previously.

Why is the significance of blue plaque?

The Blue Plaque Scheme of London was founded in 1866 is run by the William Ewart MP and the Royal Society of Arts to commemorates the association between the notable figures of past and Britain’s famous residents. More than 760 plaques have been placed across London by now. It is a uniquely successful means of connecting people and place. The Royal Society launched the scheme in 1867 with the unveiling of a commemorative tablet for Lord Byron.

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