China elected as vice chair of FATF

China was elected as vice chair of Financial Action Task Force (FATF), a global body mandated to combat terror financing and money laundering. In its plenary meeting in Paris, FATF had placed Pakistan under “grey list” subject to direct monitoring and intense scrutiny by International Cooperation Review Group till June 2018 for compliance of Anti-Money Laundering and Combating Finance of Terrorism regulations. Pakistan was on the same list from 2012 to 2015.

Financial Action Task Force (FATF)

It is an inter‐governmental policy making body that aims to establish international standards for combating money laundering and terrorist financing. It was established in 1989 during the G7 Summit in Paris (France) to combat the growing problem of money laundering. It comprises over 39 member countries including India. FATF Secretariat is housed at the headquarters of the OECD in Paris. Initially, FATF was only dealing with developing policies to combat money laundering. But in 2001 its purpose was expanded to act against terrorism financing.

Mandate

FATF set standards and promote effective implementation of legal, regulatory and operational measures for combating money laundering, terrorist financing and other related threats to integrity of international financial system.

Functions

  • Set international standards to combat money laundering and terrorist financing.
  • Assess and monitor compliance with the FATF standards.
  • Conduct studies of money laundering and terrorist financing methods, trends and techniques.
  • Respond to new and emerging threats, such as proliferation financing used for promoting proliferation of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons.

Month: Categories: International

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RISE Scheme: IITs set to get 25% of Government loans for higher education institutes

The Indian Institutes of Technology (IITs) will get largest chunk of loans on offer under Revitalising Infrastructure and Systems in Education (RISE), new funding model scheme for all centrally-run institutes. This shifts funding mechanism to CFIs in higher education from grant assistance to loans to assure more funds, greater accountability and timely completion of projects. Earlier, CFIs, on an average used to get fixed Budget grants of Rs 10,000 crore every year.

RISE scheme

RISE scheme was announced in Union Budget 2017-18. It aims to lend low-cost funds to government higher educational institutions. Under it, all centrally-funded institutes (CFIs), including central universities, IITs, IIMs, NITs and IISERs can borrow from a Rs 1,00,000 crore corpus over next 4 years to expand and build new infrastructure. It will be financed via restructured Higher Education Financing Agency (HEFA), a non-banking financial company. Distribution of loans under RISE Scheme is as follows

Key Facts

With introduction of RISE, all financing for infrastructure development at CFIs in higher education will be done through HEFA, which was set up by government as a Section 8 company (a company with charitable objectives) in 2017 to mobilise funds from the market and offer 10-year loans to centrally-run institutes.

Equity Share: In order to mobilise funds Rs. 1 lakh crore corpus under RISE, HEFA will need equity of Rs 10,000 crore, of which Rs 8,500 crore will be provided government and remaining by Canara Bank, which partnered with government to set up HEFA, and other corporations.

Target: All infrastructure and research projects sanctioned by HEFA are to be completed by December 2022.

Fund Raising: HEFA will release money directly to vendors or contractors on certification by executing agency and educational institute. Loans taken from HEFA, under the RISE programme, will be paid back over 10 years.  There will be different modes of loan repayment for different institutes, based on their internal revenue.

Month: Categories: Science & Technology

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