Arunachal Pradesh Current Affairs - 2019

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AFSPA withdrawn partially from Arunachal Pradesh

The Armed Forces (Special Powers) Act (AFSPA) was partially removed from three of nine districts of Arunachal Pradesh but would remain in force in the areas bordering Myanmar.

The State of Arunachal Pradesh had inherited AFSPA since the day of its formation. AFSPA enacted by Parliament in 1958 and was applied to the entire State of Assam and the Union Territory of Manipur. After Arunachal Pradesh, Meghalaya, Mizoram and Nagaland came into being, the Act was appropriately adapted to apply to these states as well.

Controversial Provisions of AFSPA

  • Section 4 of the AFSPA empowers an authorised officer in a disturbed area with certain powers. The authorised officer has the power to open fire at any individual even if it results in death if the individual violates laws which prohibit (a) the assembly of five or more persons; or (b) carrying of weapons. However, the officer has to give a warning before opening fire.
  • The authorised officer is also empowered to (a) arrest without a warrant; and (b) seize and search without any warrant any premise in order to make an arrest or recovery of hostages, arms and ammunition.
  • AFSPA mentions that individuals who have been taken into custody have to be handed over to the nearest police station as soon as possible. There is no prescribed time limit for detention.
  • Prosecution of an authorised officer requires prior permission of the Central government.

Observations made by Various Committees

Justice Santosh Hegde Committee found four out of six deaths it was inquiring in Manipur have similar patterns of cause of death and could be cases of fake encounters.

Justice Santosh Hegde Committee report also concluded that AFSPA has not been able to achieve peace in the Northeast, and on the contrary, it has widened the distance between the people of these areas and the mainland.

J.S. Verma Committee (2012) and the Justice Jeevan Reddy Committee (2005) have found the law arbitrary and have recommended the repeal of AFSPA.

Multi-dimensional Poverty Index 2018

The Multi-dimensional Poverty Index 2018 report prepared by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Oxford Poverty and Human Development Initiative makes the following observations about India:

  • India has reduced its poverty rate drastically from 55% to 28% in 10 years, with 271 million people moving out of poverty between 2005-06 and 2015-16.
  • India still had 364 million poor in 2015-16, the largest for any country, although it is down from 635 million in 2005-06.
  • Poverty reduction among children, the poorest states, Scheduled Tribes, and Muslims was fastest.
  • Of the 364 million people who were MPI poor in 2015-16, 156 million (34.6%) were children whereas in 2005-06 there were 292 million poor children in India. This represents a 47% decrease or 136 million fewer children growing up in multidimensional poverty.
  • Even though poverty among Muslims and STs has been reduced poverty the most over the 10 years, these two groups still had the highest rates of poverty.
  • 80% of ST members were poor in 2005-06 and 50% of them were still poor in 2015-16. While 60% of Muslims were poor in 2005-06, 31% of them were still poor in 2015-16.
  • Bihar with more than half its population in poverty was the poorest state in 2015-16.
  • The four poorest states Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, and Madhya Pradesh were still home to 196 million MPI poor people, which was over half of all the MPI poor people in India.
  • Jharkhand had shown the greatest improvement, followed by Arunachal Pradesh, Bihar, Chhattisgarh, and Nagaland.
  • Kerala, one of the least poor regions in 2006, reduced its MPI by around 92%.

Global Findings

  • 3 billion People live in multidimensional poverty in the 105 developing countries and represents 23%, or nearly a quarter, of the population of these countries, are deprived in at least one-third of overlapping indicators in health, education, and living standards.
  • Multidimensional poverty particularly acute in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia and these two regions account together for 83% (more than 1.1 billion) of all multidimensionally poor people in the world.
  • Two-thirds of all multidimensionally poor people live in middle-income countries, with 889 million people in these countries experiencing deprivations in nutrition, schooling, and sanitation.
  • The level of global child poverty is staggering, with children accounting for virtually half (49.9%) of the world’s poor. Over 665 million children live in multidimensional poverty.
  • In 35 countries, at least half of all children are MPI poor and in South Sudan and Niger around 93% of all children are MPI poor.

The MPI provides data about “who is poor” and “how they are poor”.