Bhutan Current Affairs - 2019

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Royal Bengal Tigers may not survive Climate Change: UN Report

According to a recent UN report, Climate change and rising sea levels may eventually wipe out ‘The Sundarbans’, which is one of world’s last and largest tiger strongholds. The studies of report rely on climate change scenarios developed by Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) for its simulation models.

Key Findings of Report

  • As per UN findings if greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions continued at current rate, the atmosphere would warm as much as 1.5C (above preindustrial levels) by 2040. This climate change would lead to rising sea level and existential threat to the Sundarbans.
  • In 2010, World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF, a Non-governmental organization) estimated that sea level rise of 11 inches could reduce number of tigers in Sundarbans by 96% within a few decades.
  • By 2070, there will be not be any suitable habitats of tiger remaining in Bangladesh Sundarbans.
  • 70% of Sundarbans is just a few feet above sea level, thus faces grave threat due to climate changes. It is one of the prime habitats of Bengal tigers, who are among 500,000 land species whose survival is in question because of threats to their natural habitats due to climate change.
  • Once the Sundarbans are flooded it may lead to increased confrontations (conflict) between humans and tigers, as the latter would stray outside their habitat in search of new land.
  • Conservation efforts and fight against habitat loss in Sunderbans needs to begin immediately, as it could take about 20 years for these efforts to even start showing any results, but if action isn’t taken soon there won’t be any forest or tigers to save in 50 years.

About Sundarbans

  • They are 10,000 square kilometres of marshy mangroves ecosystem shared between Bangladesh and India.
  • They hosts world’s largest mangrove forest and a rich ecosystem that supports hundreds of animal species, including Bengal tiger.
  • They are only mangrove forests in world where Bengal tigers are found.

About Bengal tiger (Panthera Tigris Tigris)

  • It is national animal of India and Bangladesh.
  • It found predominantly in India with some populations in Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, China and Myanmar.
  • Initiatives by India: As Bengal tiger species is the most numerous of all tiger subspecies (about 2,500 left in wild) Indian government undertakes various initiave to in a bid to conserve species. The Project Tiger launched in 1973 was India’s first-ever tiger conservation programme.
  • IUCN Red List Status is endangered.
  • Since early 1900s, hunting, poaching, habitat loss, and illegal trade of animal parts (to meet growing demand in Asia) have decreased global population of tigers from around 100,000 to fewer than 4,000 and puy the species at risk.

Month: Categories: Environment & BiodiversityUPSC

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BRO Celebrates 59th Raising Day on May 7

The Border Roads Organisation (BRO) was formed on on 7 May 1960, with primary goal of securing India’s borders and developing infrastructure in remote areas of India’s north and north eastern states. On 7 May 2019 BRO celebrated its 59th Raising Day (foundation day).

About BRO

  • It is a leading road construction agency under Ministry of Defence.
  • Its primary role is to provide road connectivity in India’s border areas. It also creates up-grades and maintains infrastructure along borders to meet India’s overall tactical and strategic goals.
  • Apart from road construction it also executes maintenance works along Northern and Western frontiers mainly to meet strategic requirements of Indian Army. It is responsible for over 53,000 Km roads.
  • Its work involves Formation Cutting, Surfacing, Bridge construction and Resurfacing.
  • It contributes towards India’s strategic objectives in neighbouring regions by constructing roads in friendly foreign nations like Afghanistan, Bhutan, Myanmar, Sri Lanka and Nepal.
  • Disaster management: It has played important role in reconstruction work after tsunami in Tamil Nadu in 2004, Kashmir earthquake in 2005, Ladakh flash floods in 2010 etc.

Recent Developments

  • To meet challenges of enhancing overall strategic connectivity along borders BRO has begun organizational re-structuring and simplified procedures with adequate delegation of financial powers to executives.
  • To enhance its capabilities it is now executing works in combination of departmental, contractual and EPC (Engineering, Procurement and Construction) mode.

Month: Categories: Defence & Security

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