Carbon emissions Current Affairs - 2019

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FAME-II Scheme and Energy Needs

The government had introduced the FAME II scheme to boost the adoption of electric and hybrid vehicles in the country. The Confederation of Indian Industry (CII) has made the following observations about the scheme:

  • It estimates that India can save 64% of anticipated road-based mobility-related energy demand and 37% of carbon emissions in 2030 by pursuing a shared, electric, and connected mobility future.
  • This reduction in energy demand would result in the reduction of 156 million tonnes of oil equivalent (Mtoe) in diesel and petrol consumption for that year and net saving of approximately $60 billion in 2030 at present oil prices.
  • Further, this would give impetus to India’s vision of reducing oil imports by 10% by 2022.
  • The electric vehicle penetration in India is currently at just 1%, FAME alone is not enough to reach the 30% electric vehicles target by 2030.
  • CII calls for boosting of the domestic manufacturing of vehicles, components and batteries needed to be boosted, along with skill development across the value chain, and the strategic sourcing of key raw material.
  • For transport to go truly green, there must be accompanied by a rising share of renewables along with environmentally sustainable batteries.

Transport sector in India continues to be the highest oil consuming sector and the use of diesel and petrol grew at 5.9% and 9.9% respectively in the last 10 years. India’s import dependency on oil has increased from 78.3 per cent of total consumption in 2014-15 to settling at a new high of 83.7% in the 10-month period of FY19. Hence FAME scheme has multiple benefits for both the economy and environment.

Month: Categories: Government SchemesUPSC

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China launches TanSat satellite to monitor global carbon emissions

China successfully launched TanSat, a global carbon dioxide (CO2) monitoring satellite to understand the effects of climate change.

It was launched on board of Long March-2D rocket from Jiuquan Satellite Launch Centre in northwest China’s Gobi Desert.  It was the 243rd mission of the Long March series rockets.

With this, China became third country after Japan and United States to have its own satellite to monitor greenhouse gases (GHGs).

About TanSat satellite

  • TanSat will thoroughly examine global CO2 levels every 16 days, accurate to at least 4 ppm (parts per million).
  • It weighs 620-kg and will be located in sun synchronous orbit about 700 kms above the earth. It has three-year mission life.
  • It will thoroughly monitor the concentration, distribution and flow of CO2 levels every 16 days, accurate to at least 4 ppm (parts per million) in the atmosphere.
  • The satellite will help understanding of climate change and provide China’s policy makers with independent emissions data in first-hand and share it with researchers worldwide.
  • It will give China a louder voice on climate change, carbon reduction negotiation and bigger say on carbon trading.

Month: Categories: EnvironmentScience & Technology

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