Environment Current Affairs

Mouse deer reintroduced for first time in Telangana forest

Telangana Forest Department for first time has re-introduced ‘mouse deer’ in the forests of Nallamalla in Amrabad Tiger Reserve (ATR) bred at Nehru Zoological Park, Hyderabad.

Eight mouse deer, two male and six females were released from captivity to semi-wild conditions having protected enclosure of 2.14 hectares. Now field biologists and forest staff will closely monitor their adaptability and behaviour in their natural setting, so they can be released from their enclosure into the wild.

Background

Since 2010, Nehru Zoological Park in collaboration with Laboratory for Conservation of Endangered Species (LaCONES) of Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB), and Central Zoo Authority, Delhi were carrying out a breeding programme for conservation of mouse-deer. They have successfully raised total population of mouse deer to 172, which includes 76 females

Mouse deer

Mouse deer (also known as Spotted Chevrotain) is one of the endangered species. It looks like weird mash-up of a deer, mouse and pig. It is not considered true deer, but shares suborder with deer (Ruminantia). It has its own family called Tragulidae. It is nocturnal.

Because of their small size they are smallest ungulates (large mammals) in the world. It is found in deciduous and evergreen forests throughout India. Its population is on decline due to destruction of their habitat and poaching.

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ZSI releases first compendium of animal species in Indian Sundarbans

Zoological Survey of India (ZSI) has published first of its kind compendium titled Fauna of Sundarban Biosphere Reserve in Indian Sundarbans. It has consolidated and updated information of faunal diversity of Sundarbans.

Indian segment of Sundarbans is part of UNESCO World Heritage site. It forms part of Ganga-Brahmaputra delta across 9,630 sq. km, distributed among 104 islands. It has largest tidal halophytic mangrove forest in the world.

Key Facts

The compendium catalogues entire faunal diversity of Sundarban Biosphere Reserve covering 9,630 sq. km spread over 19 blocks in North 24 Parganas and South 24 Parganas districts of West Bengal. According to it, fragile Sundarbans ecosystem region hosts 2,626 animal species that come under zoological kingdom of Animalia, and 140 under more primitive Protista. It also includes diverse 25 phyla.

Animal and Mammalian species: Famous Bengal tigers adapted to aquatic conditions have been documented. 50 mammalian species are also documented including the Asian small-clawed Otter, Gangetic Dolphin, Grey and Marsh Mongoose. Wild Rhesus Monkey, only primate found in Sunderbans is also documented.

The mammal numbers are declining in Sunderbans due to pressure on habitat from people and natural threats that have shrunk mangrove swamp habitat. Two Rhinos, Swamp deer, Barking deer and Hog deer and Asiatic Wild Water Buffalo no more are not found in Sundarbans.

Bird species: There are 356 species of birds, including raptors (birds of prey). Other birds found here are Osprey, Brahminy Kite, White-Bellied Sea Eagle, Rose-ringed parakeets, flycatchers and warblers. Kingfishers are found abound and Sundarbans has nine of them.

Fish and amphibian species: The mangrove ecosystem covers about 350 species of fish. Cartilaginous fish make up 10.3%. The IUCN conservation status shows 6.3% fish are near-threatened and 4.85% are threatened. Also, there are 173 molluscs. Moreover, Crustaceans — crabs, shrimp and prawns — constitute 334 species. Besides, ten species of frogs and toads are found. There are 11 turtles, including the famous Olive Ridley, Hawskbill sea turtles and most threatened freshwater River Terrapin.

Insect and Reptile species: The region has 753 insect species. Of these, 210 are butterflies and moths. Crocodile, 13 lizards including three species of Monitor Lizards and five Geckos are also found. The rivers, creeks channels and islands together harbour about 30 snake species including monocled cobra, Russell’s viper, common and banded kraits.

Zoological Survey of India (ZSI)

ZSI is India’s apex organization on animal taxonomy. It was established in 1916. Its objective is to promote the survey, exploration, research and documentation on various aspects of animal taxonomy in Indian subcontinent. It also seeks advancement of knowledge on animal taxonomy. It has been declared as the designated repository for the National Zoological Collection as per section 39 of the National Biodiversity Act, 2002.

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