Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Current Affairs - 2020

NASA announces SUNRISE Mission

On March 30, 2020, NASA announced Sun Radio Interferometer Space Experiment (SUNRISE) mission. The mission is to study about how sun creates Giant Solar Particle Storms.

Highlights

Studying the solar storms, the mission aims to understand the working of the solar system. The study will also aid future astronauts travelling to Mars and protect them from solar storms.

About the Mission

The mission is to deploy six CubeSats in Geosynchronous-orbit. The mission has come true because of the success of DARPA High-Frequency Research and Mars Cube One (MARCO).

Tasks assigned to SUNRISE

The Cubesats will use radio telescope to capture radio images of low-frequency emission that are emitted from the sun. These will be sent to the earth through Deep Space Network. Also, the Cubesats will create a 3D mapping to learn about location of giant particle that are originated from the sun.

The mission is to study sun’s spectrum. This is important as sun’s spectrum cannot be studied from the earth due to the ionosphere.

Cabinet nod to GSLV Ph-4 Continuation Programme

The Union Cabinet has approved the continuation of the ongoing Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) programme phase-4 consisting of five rocket flights during 2021-2024.

GSLV Ph-4

  • The GSLV phase four will enable the launch of two-tonne class of satellites for geo-imaging, navigation, data relay communication and space sciences.
  • The total fund requirement for phase four has been pegged at Rs 2729.13 crores. The cost includes the cost of five Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicles (GSLVs), essential facility augmentation, programme management, and launch campaign, along with the additional funds required for meeting the scope of the ongoing programme.
  • The GSLV continuation programme is expected to meet the launch requirement of satellites for providing critical satellite navigation services, data relay communication for supporting the Indian human spaceflight programme and the next interplanetary mission to Mars.
  • The continuation programme will meet the demand for the launch of satellites at a frequency up to two launches per year.

The GSLV continuation programme was initially sanctioned in 2003, and two phases have been completed and the third phase is in progress and expected to be completed by the fourth quarter of 2020-21.