Indian Space Research Organisation Current Affairs - 2019

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CMFRI, ISRO ink MoU to protect Smaller Wetlands

The Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) and the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) have signed an MoU to map, validate and protect smaller wetlands in the coastal region and restore them through coastal livelihood programmes.

Smaller wetlands (which were smaller than 2.25 hectares) cover an area of more than 5 lakh hectares across the country, with Kerala alone having as many as 2,592 such wetlands.

About the MoU

  • As per the MoU, a mobile app and a centralised web portal with a complete database of wetlands in the country which were smaller than 2.25 hectares will be developed.
  • The two institutes will identify and demarcate the wetlands and restore the degraded ones through suitable livelihood options such as coastal aquaculture.
  • A mobile app will be used for real-time monitoring of the wetlands and giving advisories to the stakeholders and the coastal people.
  • The collaboration is part of the national framework for fisheries and wetlands recently developed under the National Innovations in Climate Resilient Agriculture (NICRA).
  • As per the agreement, National Wetland Atlas which has been already developed by the Space Applications Centre of ISRO will be updated with real-time data of physical, chemical and biological parameters of the wetlands to be provided by the CMFRI.
  • The collaboration will aid in developing a comprehensive wetland information system which could facilitate the village-level wetland advisories to the local people by scientific communities.

The National Innovations in Climate Resilient Agriculture (NICRA) is aimed at finding ways and means to mitigate the impact of climate change on marine fisheries and coastal region.

 

Month: Categories: EnvironmentUPSC

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ISRO Successfully launched Emisat Satellite into Orbit

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) has successfully launched an electronic intelligence satellite ‘Emisat’ for the Defence Research Development Organisation (DRDO) along with 28 third party satellites.

About the Launch

The notable aspects of the launch were a new variant of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV); switching off and on the fourth stage engine couple of times; and the use of the fourth stage as an orbital platform carrying three experimental payloads.

PSLV first placed the 436 kg Emisat into a 749 km orbit. Then the rocket was brought down to put the 28 satellites into orbit, at an altitude of 504 km.

Then the rocket was brought down further to 485 km where the fourth stage/engine transformed into a payload platform carrying three experimental payloads:

  • Automatic Identification System (AIS) from ISRO – for maritime satellite applications capturing messages transmitted from ships.
  • Automatic Packet Repeating System (APRS) from AMSAT (Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation), India – to assist amateur radio operators in tracking and monitoring position data.
  • Advanced Retarding Potential Analyser for Ionospheric Studies (ARIS) from Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology (IIST) – for the structural and compositional studies of the ionosphere.

For the first time, the launch also demonstrated new technology of putting payloads into three different orbits with a new variant of the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) rocket.

Month: Categories: Science & TechnologyUPSC

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