Jharkhand Current Affairs

Patratu Super Thermal Power Project: PM Narendra Modi lays foundation stone in Jharkhand

Prime Minister Narendra Modi laid foundation stone for first phase (2400MW) of NTPC’s coal based Patratu Super Thermal Power Project in Jharkhand. The project is 74: 26 Joint Venture between Government of Jharkhand (GoJ) and Patratu Vidyut Utpadan Nigam Ltd. (PVUN), a subsidiary company of NTPC. The Engineering, Procurement & Construction (EPC) contract of project is awarded to BHEL.

Patratu Super Thermal Power Project

NTPC’s PVUNL will develop project in two phases viz. 2,400 MW (3x800MW) in Phase-I and 1,600 MW (2×800 MW) in Phase-II later. The first unit is envisaged to be commissioned in 2022 and subsequently other two units each of 800 MW after interval of six months each from the preceding unit.

This project will allocate 85% of power to Jharkhand that will benefit state in the long run and help in economic growth of region. It will ensure providing 24×7 power availability to households in Jharkhand under Pradhan Mantri Sahaj Bijli Har Ghar Yojana (Saubhagya) scheme.

The project also complies with new emission norms with high efficiency ESP, FGD and Nox emission control systems. It has dry ash disposable system (second to NTPC Dadri), zero liquid discharge system, air-cooled condenser technology (only second to North Karanpura STPP) and rail loading facility for transportation of ash.

Tags:

Worsening air quality major cause of premature deaths in India: Study

According recent research, worsening air quality in last two decades has emerged as one of major reasons for high numbers of premature deaths in India. The research was conducted by Indian Institute of Technology (IIT)-Delhi in collaboration with environmental NGO Centre for Environment and Energy Development (CEED).

Background

The study was conducted 11 north Indian cities i.e. seven in Uttar Pradesh (Allahabad, Kanpur, Lucknow, Meerut, Varanasi and Gorakhpur), three in Bihar (Patna, Muzaffarpur and Gaya) and one in Jharkhand (Ranchi). It calculated annual mortality burden through averages of recorded deaths caused due to Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), Acute Lower Respiratory Infection (ALRI), coronary disease, stroke, and lung cancer in these 11 cities. It also used satellite-based high-resolution PM2.5 database to generate particulate matter statistics for past 17 years.

Key Findings of Research

The annual mortality linked to air pollution was in range of 150-300 persons per 1 lakh population. Kanpur recorded highest number of premature deaths per year (4,173) due to chronic exposure to air pollution, followed by Lucknow (4,127), Agra (2,421), Meerut (2,044), Varanasi (1,581), Allahabad (1,443) and Gorakhpur (914).

COPD was largest cause of deaths (at 29.7%) and lung cancer the lowest (0.6%). The largest share in total burden was attributed to ALRI in Agra and Meerut and to COPD in Allahabad, Gaya, Gorakhpur, Kanpur, Lucknow, Patna, Muzaffarpur and Varanasi.

The estimates were not instant deaths, but represented premature (earlier than expected lifetime of Indian population) deaths due to chronic exposure from pollution. This premature mortality burden will be reduced by 14 to 28% annually if these cities achieve of Indian air quality standards.

The mean annual ambient fine particulate matter (PM) concentration was 75-120% higher than Indian annual air quality standard in 10 of 11 cities. The residential (cooking, heating and lighting) sources are largest contributors to annual ambient PM2.5 concentration (73.8%). Moreover, analysis of aerosol composition indicates higher percentage of sulphates, organic carbons and black carbon emitted primarily from anthropogenic sources.

Tags:

Advertisement

12345...102030...32