Mahatma Gandhi Current Affairs

2 October: International Day of Non-violence

The International Day of Non-violence is celebrated every year on 2 October throughout world on the birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi, leader of Indian independence movement and also pioneer of philosophy of non-violence (ahimsa).

Observance of this day seeks to promote principles of non-violence through education and public awareness and is observed by all countries of the UN. In India, this day is celebrated as Gandhi Jayanti.

International day of Non-Violence

The day was instituted by the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) by adopting resolution A/RES/61/271 in June 2007 to disseminate the message of non-violence, including through education and public awareness. The resolution reaffirmed universal relevance of principle of non-violence and the desire to secure a culture of peace, tolerance, understanding and non-violence.

Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi (Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi) is known for playing main role in freeing India from clutches of British. He was born on 2 October 1869 in Porbandar, in Bombay Presidency of British India. He was assassinated on January 30, 1948, by Nathuram Godse.

Gandhiji is fondly known as ‘Bapu’ for his selfless contribution towards India’s Independence struggle. He is unofficially called Father of the Nation. He had studied law at University College London. He later returned to India and worked with Indian Firm in South Africa.

Gandhiji returned to India in 1915 and joined Indian National Congress. He led nationwide campaigns for various social causes and for achieving Swaraj or self-rule. He led peaceful protests and started creating awareness about oppress rule of British in India. His non-violent methods including Satyagraha and Civil Disobedience is known worldwide.

Some of the famous protests led by Gandhiji against British rule include Dandi March and non-cooperation movement that gave severe blows to the British government. Eventually, his fame spread all over India and in year 1921 he became leader of Indian National Congress,

He lived modestly in self-sufficient residential community and wore traditional Indian dhoti and shawl, woven with yarn hand-spun on charkha. He also undertook long fasts as a means of both self-purification and political protest. At multiple times he was jailed however he continued his efforts.

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75th anniversary of Quit India Movement

The 75th anniversary of the Quit India Movement was observed across the country. This year’s theme was “Sankalp se Siddhi- the attainment through resolve”.

 Prime Minister Narendra Modi in his recent Mann Ki Baat programme had called for launching the mega campaign Sankalp Se Siddhi. The campaign pledges to build new India by 2022. It calls on everyone to pledge together towards Clean India, Poverty–free India, Corruption-free India, Terrorism-free India, Communalism-free India, Casteism-free India.

Prime Minister Modi also had termed the month of August as a month of revolution as the non-cooperation movement was launched on August 1, 1920, Quit-India movement on August 9, 1942 and on August 15, 1947 India became independent. 

Quit India Movement

The Quit India Movement (Bharat Chhodo Andolan or the August Movement (August Kranti)) was an important milestone in the Indian freedom struggle. It was a civil disobedience movement launched at the Bombay session of the All-India Congress Committee (AICC) by Mahatma Gandhi on 8 August 1942 demanding an end to British Rule of India. It was launched after Mahatma Gandhi had made a call to Do or Die in his Quit India speech delivered in Bombay at the Gowalia Tank Maidan on 7 August 1942. Gandhi hoped to bring the British government to the negotiating table as the Cripps Mission had failed. Quit India Resolution drafted by Jawaharlal Nehru and was moved by him on 8th August 1942 in AICCC session and Sardar Patel seconded it. Under the leadership of Mahatma Gandhi, people across India came together to uproot imperialism.

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