Medical Technology Current Affairs - 2020

Versius: world’s smallest surgical robot developed by UK scientists

Scientists in the United Kingdom (UK) have developed the world’s smallest surgical robot called Versius. It was developed using low-cost technology used in mobile phones and space industries.

The robot can mimic human arm and can be used to carry out a wide range of surgical procedures. It can be controlled by a surgeon using a console guided by a 3D screen in the operating theatre.

Key Facts

Versius can make series of small incisions that will circumvent the need for traditional open surgery. These include colorectal operations, hernia repairs, as well as prostate, ear, nose and throat surgery. It is much easier to use than existing systems, and requires about a third of the space of current machines.

It works like a human arm and contains technology that detects resistance to make sure the right amount of force is used when the instruments are inside the patient. It can help to reduce complications and pain after surgery and speed up recovery time for patients.

Scientists develop injectable tissue bandage to repair hearts

Scientists from the University of Toronto, Canada have developed an injectable tissue bandage dubbed as AngioChip, smaller than a postage stamp that can repair damaged hearts.

The AngioChip is a tiny patch of heart tissue with its own blood vessels and heart cells beating with a regular rhythm. It is made out of the biocompatible, biodegradable polymer.

Key Facts

Repairing heart tissue destroyed by a heart attack or medical condition with regenerative cells usually requires invasive open-heart surgery which usually poses more risks than potential benefits. The newly developed technique lets researchers to inject a repair patch (AngioChip) using a small needle, without the need to open up the chest cavity. Researchers by injecting the patch into rat hearts have shown that it can improve cardiac function after a heart attack.