Reporters Without Borders Current Affairs - 2019

Category Wise PDF Compilations available at This Link

World Press Freedom Index 2019

International NGO, Reporters without Borders has released the World Press Freedom Index 2019. The index is based on the assessment of the countries’ press freedom records in the previous year.

The report is partly based on a questionnaire which asks questions about pluralism, media independence, environment and self-censorship, legislative framework, transparency, and infrastructure.

World Press Freedom Index 2019

  • The World Press Freedom Index 2019′, topped by Norway which is followed by Finland, Sweden, Netherlands and Denmark.
  • The 2019 index finds that hatred against journalists has degenerated into violence, contributing to an increase in fear around the world.
  • India has dropped two places on a global press freedom index to be ranked 140th out of 180 countries and the report indicates an increased sense of hostility towards journalists across the world, with violent attacks in India leading to at least six Indian journalists being killed in the line of their work last year.
  • The report notes that at least six Indian journalists were killed in connection with their work in 2018. Violence against journalists including police violence, attacks by Maoist fighters and reprisals by criminal groups or corrupt politicians is one of the most striking characteristics of the current state of press freedom in India.
  • The murder of journalists highlighted the many dangers that Indian journalists face, especially those working for non-English-language media outlets in rural areas.
  • South Asia in general features poorly on the index. Pakistan has dropped three places to 142, and Bangladesh has dropped four places to 150.
  • In Africa, Ethiopia (up 40 at 110th) and Gambia (up 30 at 92nd) have significantly improved from last year’s Index.
  • Both Vietnam (176th) and China (177th) have fallen one place and Turkmenistan (down two at 180th) is now last, replacing North Korea (up one at 179th).

The report concludes that the number of countries regarded as safe, where journalists can work in complete security, continues to decline, while authoritarian regimes continue to tighten their grip on the media.

Indian Historian Sanjay Subrahmanyam wins the Dan David Prize

Indian historian Sanjay Subrahmanyam has won prestigious Dan David Prize of Israel for the year 2019 for his work on inter-cultural encounters between Asians, Europeans and people of North and South America during the early modern era.

Sanjay Subrahmanyam shares the award in the category of ‘past time dimension’ with Prof Kenneth Pomeranz of the University of Chicago.

Dan David Prize

The Dan David Prize is a joint international award given by the Dan David Foundation headquartered at Tel Aviv University. The award was instituted by late Dan David, an international businessman and philanthropist who envisioned a project that would extend beyond traditional academic categorisations.

The Dan David Prize is awarded under three categories namely:

  • Past category is generally drawn from the fields of history, archaeology, palaeontology and biography.
  • Present from arts, media, policy and economics.
  • Future from one of the exact or natural sciences.

For the Year 2019, the awardees were chosen from the three categories for their work:

  • Macrohistory: Past category
  • Defending democracy: Present
  • Combating climate change: Future

The award in the “Present” category for “Defending Democracy” has been won by Reporters without Borders and Prof Michael Ignatieff.

The prize in the “future” category for combating climate change has been won by Christina Figueres, a Costa Rican diplomat

To encourage and foster new generations of scholars, the awardees are required to donate 10 per cent of their prize money towards scholarships for graduate or post-graduate researchers in their respective fields.