Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act Current Affairs - 2019

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Pro-Khalistan group ‘The Sikhs for Justice’ banned by govt.

Pro-Khalistani group ‘The Sikhs for Justice’ (SFJ) has been banned by Central government for its alleged anti-national activities. In a recently held Union Cabinet meeting decision was taken to ban on Sikh fundamentalist organisation SFJ under Section 3 of Unlawful Activities Prevention Act (UAPA) for its alleged anti-national activities.

Reasons for ban given by government is that the Sikhs for Justice has been indulging in activities prejudicial to internal security of India and public order and have potential of disturbing peace and unity and integrity of country. Also, the group openly espouses cause of Khalistan and in that process challenges the sovereignty and territorial integrity of India.

About The Sikhs for Justice

It is a US-based Pro-Khalistani group that was formed in 2007.

It is headed by Avtar Singh Pannun and Gurpatwant Singh Pannun. The internal group of SFJ comprises of 8 to 10 people but, it’s online support is close to 2 lakh.

SFJ primary objective: to establish an independent and sovereign country in Punjab.

It gained prominence only in last 5 years as it started advocating a separate Khalisatn state. For this purpose it also started an online secessionist campaign, ‘Sikh Referendum 2020’. SKJ pushes for Sikh Referendum 2020 as part of its separatist agenda.

Cases Registered: Punjab Police has registered 10 different cases against SFJ and it’s members, while National Investigation Agency (NIA) is also probing group in one case. But in all 11 cases, investigators found that SFJ was providing money and logistical support to local terrorists in Punjab to carry out subversive activities.

What is Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act?

It is an Indian law which is aimed at effective prevention of unlawful activities associations in India.

Objective: to make powers available for dealing with activities directed against integrity and sovereignty of India.

UAPA was first framed in 1967, and since then it has been amended twice- first in 2008 and then in 2012.

Month: Categories: Defence & Security

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Indian Government Extends Ban on LTTE for Five Years

The Ministry of Home Affairs in a freshly issued notification extended ban on the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE, also known as: Tamil Tigers) in India for a another period of five years.

Key Highlights

Ban: The Union Home Ministry notified extended ban (of 5 years) to LTTE under sub-sections (1) and (3) of section 3 of the Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act, 1967 (37 of 1967) with immediate effect, thus declared LTTE as an Unlawful Association.

Reasons by GoI: Notification states that-

  • Even after LTTE’s military defeat in May 2009, it continues to adopt a strong anti-India posture and also continues to pose a grave threat to security of Indian nationals.
  • It has continued its disruptive and violent activities which are prejudicial to integrity and sovereignty of India.

Recent Findings:

  • LTTE has not abandoned concept of Tamil Eelam and is undertaking propaganda activities and fundraising for its Eelam cause in Europe.
  • The pro-LTTE groups and Tamil chauvinist groups continue to foster separatist tendencies amongst Indian masses especially in Tamil Nadu. Recently, activities of LTTE remnant cadres and supporters have been traced out in Tamil Nadu.
    • The Diaspora continued to spread anti-India feeling amongst Sri Lankan Tamils through their articles in Internet, by holding Indian Government responsible for defeat of LTTE.

About Liberation Tigers Of Tamil Eelam (LTTE)

  • It is a Sri Lanka based Tamil militant and political organization, which was founded in 1976.
  • Its objective is to create an independent state of Tamil Eelam in the north and east of Sri Lanka (areas comprising Tamil Majority).
  • It was banned in India following the assassination of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi in 1991 by its members.

Month: Categories: Governance & Politics

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